Monthly Archives: March 2014

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Orange Baboon Tarantula [Billie 009] March2014 Monthly Update

I brought home my Pterinochilus murinus on November 20, 2013. It’s so famous in the hobby and so cheap, why not get one? Jurassic Pets had one about a year old and I just couldn’t resist.  Read More →

Gooty Sapphire [007] March 2014

Molt (2): March 1, 2014 @ 67 days
2.2 inches

She’s still really small for such a long wait between molts. I keep my collection just above room temperature, without supplemental heating. There’s no thermostat in the apartment, just an on/off heat switch, so I’m not sure exactly how warm it is, but it’s often too warm for me. It could be that she’s slowed down for the winter. The other Poeci species I keep are from cooler regions, and they are molting on time. Or maybe P. metallica grows slower in general. Either way, she looks fucking brilliant now.

I don’t feel like the pictures do her justice. She really looks like her species now. Suddenly, the little spiderling that I threw so much money at on an impulse is a gem in my collection. She’s still not my favorite, but at least I don’t regret her.


Now we’re getting somewhere. I gently brushed a front toe to trigger a threat stance. This is the first I’ve made contact with her directly since her March molt. Otherwise, she usually flees from perceived threats at a slow (for an arboreal) pace.

Tarantula Profile: Stromatopelma sp.

Maximum Size

  • Females can reach up to 13 – 18 cm / 5 – 7 inches.
  • Fast growth rate.

Visibility

  • Reclusive, will remain hidden until it detects a disturbance. 

Temperament

  • Proactively Defensive (Aggressive), will go out of its way to fend you off, teleports, and bites without hesitation.

Habitat

  • Old World (West Africa) Arboreal, but also digs significant tunnels.
  • Thrives at warmer temperatures, but tolerates domestic climates.
  • Thrives with some humidity if fed sparingly, otherwise substrate can be kept bone-dry if consistent water and food are provided.

Hide Construction

  • While juveniles prefer to burrow and are extremely reclusive, subadults and older will appreciate a more vertical space. Hides that provide maximum darkness are ideal. 

(Last reviewed March 2014)

Tarantula Profile: Poecilotheria sp.

Maximum Size

  • Females can reach up to 20 – 23 cm / 8 – 10 inches.
  • Fast growth rate, males mature in 1.5 – 2 years.

Visibility

  • Somewhat Reclusive

Temperament

  • Defensive or quick to flee, but generally mild mannered if unprovoked.

Habitat

  • Old World Arboreal, but juveniles remain close to the ground, burrow, and add substrate to hides of their own construction.
  • Most species thrive at warmer temperatures, but tolerates domestic climates. P. rufilata, P. smithi, and P. subfusca do best when kept without (or with minimal) supplemental heating, at room temperature.
  • Thrives with light to moderate humidity, substrate should not be kept bone-dry. P. fasciata and P. regalis are from dry climates and are more tolerant.

Hide Construction

  • Adults prefer to hide in a space where they can rest vertically on a surface, so provide upright hiding places where they can retreat from light. Juveniles will remain less visible, hiding themselves in a dirt covered web, sometimes below the substrate. A shorter piece of cork bark at a less than upright angle is perfect.

(Last reviewed March 2014)

Tarantula Profile: Lampropelma sp.

Maximum Size

  • Males mature around 9 – 14 cm / 3.5 – 5 inches
  • Females mature around 12 – 13 cm, but can reach up to 14 – 20 cm / 5 – 7.5 inches.
  • Moderate growth rate.

Visibility

  • Reclusive, prefers extreme dark if it has the opportunity. 

Temperament

  • Defensive, will stand her ground.

Habitat

  • Old World & Arboreal, but also digs significant tunnels.
  • Thrives at warmer temperatures, but tolerates domestic climates.
  • Thrives with some humidity, substrate should not be kept bone-dry.

Hide Construction

  • This T is found in trees, but seems to prefer burrowing in captivity because it creates a darker home. Provide a hide that keeps out light, although she’ll probably still choose to dig her own hide under/behind it.

(Last reviewed March 2014)